A rendering of the one of a kind climbing structure that will wind its way the length of the Museum and rise from floor to ceiling and up into the skylights above. 

A rendering of the one of a kind climbing structure that will wind its way the length of the Museum and rise from floor to ceiling and up into the skylights above. 

WHAT IS A CLIMBER?
Climbers by Luckey Climbers are multi-story mazes, visually elegant works of art, part jungle gym, part climbing tree, and one of a kind sculptures that allow children to test their limits while taking safe risks.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE CLIMBER AT THE WESTCHESTER CHILDREN'S MUSEUM?
The Climber at the Westchester Children’s Museum will be the largest structure of its kind ever designed by Luckey Climbers. It will anchor and traverse the vast interior of the historic landmark Bathhouse at Playland transforming it into a vibrant, state of the art, physically challenging while mentally rewarding space for children.

The Climber, comprised of intersecting, layered climbing platforms suspended by secure cabling and safety netting, will stretch 120 feet and dip down to the floor and up into the skylights more than 14 feet above.

WHO IS LUCKEY CLIMBER AND WHY DOES IT MATTER?
Founded by Yale architect Thomas Luckey in 1985, Luckey LLC is a design-build firm specializing in creating unique and imaginative climbing structures for children-oriented institutional and commercial clients. Tom Luckey passed away in 2012 but the company continues to grow and flourish under the oversight of engineering marvel Spencer Luckey with Climbers now found in children’s museum across the globe at such institutions as the Boston Children’s Museum, Liberty Science Center, Franklin Institute, and Science Center Singapore. The Westchester Children’s Museum will have the only such structure in our region.  

WHY DOES SPENCER LUCKEY DESIGN THESE TYPES OF STRUCTURES?
"This is just a theory," Luckey says, "but kids look at castles and pirate ships. and they go, 'Well, do I have to be a pirate to go in the pirate ship? I kind of feel ike being a bad guy or having a tea party today." 

His idea, in no small part, is to enable freedom for children inside his climbers without excluding anyone.

"Kids are just constantly looking up. They want to shed their kid baggage and get some authority," Luckey adds. "Part of the idea is to enable that and give them a proper voice that doesn't reptend to be somethig that it isn't."     
-Smithsonian.com

Click here to read more in this Smithsonian Magazine (October 2016) profile on designer Spencer Luckey and his incredible climbing structures.